What is 100 Belgian francs worth

Coins with silver content

    • Australia: 50 cents (until 1966)
    • Belgium: 20 Francs (until 1955), 50 Francs (until 1954) and 100 Francs (until 1954)
    • Brazil: 5000 rice (until 1938)
    • Bulgaria: 100 leva (until 1937)
    • Denmark: 10 Øre (up to 1919), 25 Øre (up to 1919), 1 crown (up to 1916), 2 crowns (up to 1916)
    • Germany: 5 marks (until 1974) | 5 mark 1933-1939 | 50 pfennigs 1875-1903
    • Finland: 1 mark (until 1968)
    • France: 5 francs (until 1969) / 1 franc 1866-1920
    • Greece: 20 drachmas (until 1960)
    • India: 1/4 rupee (until 1945), 1/2 rupee (until 1945), 1 rupee (until 1945)
    • Italy: 500 lire (until 1970)
    • Japan: 100 yen (until 1966)
    • Yugoslavia: 20 dinars (until 1938), 50 dinars (until 1938)
    • Canada: 10 cents (until 1968), 25 cents (until 1968), 50 cents (until 1966), 1 dollar (until 1966)
    • Mexico: 25 pesos (until 1972)
    • Netherlands: 1 guilder (until 1967), 2 1/2 guilders (until 1966)
    • Norway: 10 Øre (up to 1919), 25 Øre (up to 1919), 50 Øre (up to 1919), 1 crown (up to 1917), 2 crowns (up to 1917)

The silver content of coins is very different

  • Austria: 5 Schilling (until 1968), 10 Schilling (until 1973)
  • Poland: 2 zloty (until 1936), 5 zloty (until 1938), 10 zloty (until 1939)
  • Portugal: 10 escudos (until 1955)
  • Romania: 25,000 lei (until 1946), 100,000 lei (until 1946)
  • Sweden: 5 kroner (until 1971)
  • Switzerland: 1/2 franc (until 1967), 1 franc (until 1967), 2 francs (until 1967), 5 francs (until 1969)
  • Spain: 100 pesetas (until 1970)
  • Soviet Union: 10 kopeks (until 1931), 15 kopeks (until 1931), 20 kopeks (until 1931)
  • South Africa: 1 rand (until 1976)
  • Czechoslovakia: 5 kroner (until 1931), 10 kroner (until 1933), 20 kroner (until 1934)
  • Turkey: 50 Kurus (until 1948), 1 Lira (until 1948)
  • Hungary: 5 forints (until 1947)
  • United Kingdom: 3 pence (until 1944), 6 pence (until 1946), 1 shilling (until 1946), 2 shillings (until 1946), 1/2 krone (until 1946)

silberpreis24.de Image: © Harald Wanetschka / pixelio.de

Panorama | Knowledge:

silver

Silver is a metal that is one of the coin metals. It is soft and easy to work with. Silver has been used since the 5th millennium BC. Used. It has already been used by many peoples, for example the Assyrians, the Goths, the Greeks, the Romans, the Egyptians and the Teutons. At times it was even considered more valuable than gold.

Silver is a rare metal that only occurs at 0.079 ppm (0.0000079%) on the earth's crust. But that is about 20 times more common than gold. The silver ores contain most of the silver. Silver was found in the following places: Freiberg / Erzgebirge; Kongsberg / Norway (large crystals); St. Andreasberg / Harz; Keweenaw Peninsula / USA; Batopilas / Mexico; Mansfeld copper slate district.

In the past, silver coins were the most important means of payment. In the Middle Ages, only gold, silver, bronze and copper were used for coins. In 1871 silver coins were predominant in Germany, so the whole currency was secured with silver. Then it was replaced by gold.

Silver is used to make jewelry, cutlery, silverware and sacred implements. The fineness mark can be read on jewelry, devices and bars.

In sports competitions, silver medals are awarded as a sign of second place, for example at the Olympic Games. This is because silver is the second most precious metal after gold. However, only fine gold, not broken gold or old gold.

Commemorative coins

A commemorative coin is a specially minted coin whose motif or lettering reminds of a memorable event or an important personality. Commemorative coins are mostly made of a precious metal such as gold or silver.

Commemorative coins were previously commissioned by rulers, they were dedicated to the family or to state political events. There are many commemorative coins for weddings, births or deaths in the ruling house. Commemorative coins always had a propaganda function at that time. Nowadays, commemorative coins are mostly minted only for collectors.

By definition, commemorative coins are valid means of payment, but their fitness for circulation is different from that of current coins. Commemorative coins are very rarely used as a means of payment, as their face value is often impractical and they are not known to all peoples.

However, there are also modern forms of commemorative coins, such as the "two euro commemorative coin". It is an officially recognized means of payment, with a different motif embossed on the back. This commemorative coin has been in circulation since 2006 and is practical.

Productions that have similar functions as the commemorative coin, but have no monetary value, are called medals. They are used, for example, at the Olympic Games at the award ceremony.