William Howard Duvall and a US Navy admiral

Warshipfacts

USS JOSEPH HEWES (AP-50)

biography

Joseph Hewes
Born January 23, 1730 in Kingston, New Jersey
† November 10, 1779 in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania
Signed the United States' Declaration of Independence for North Carolina, making it one of the American Founding Fathers

Joseph Hewes grew up near Kingston, New Jersey. His parents, Aaron and Providence Hewes, were Quakers and were members of the Society of Friends. They moved from Connecticut to New Jersey because of religious prejudice. In New Jersey, Joseph Hewes received a classical education at Princeton College. After graduation, the dealer and importer Joseph Ogden took him on as an apprenticeship in Philadelphia. Hewes learned a lot there. This knowledge, coupled with his work ethic, contributed to his financial success. After Hewes had completed his apprenticeship, he started a successful and independent trading career. Hewe's success was not unusual. The growing merchants in the British overseas territory and their increasing wealth led England to pay large amounts of tax money to the mother country. At the age of 30, Joseph Hewes moved to Edenton, North Carolina. There he earned an honorable reputation over the next three years. He had the respect and trust of his neighbors and colleagues in this British colony. With his honorable business conduct and charm, Joseph Hewes was elected to the North Carolina legislature in 1763. He was then a member of the Colonial Legislature of the Province from 1766-1775. Due to his growing popularity, Hewes served in 1775 as a member of the correspondence committee of the new state parliament. According to the Massachusetts delegates, Hewes was a pioneer of independence. He influenced the members of the legislative assembly so much that in the years leading up to the American independence movement, many of them were rebellious.
In 1774 North Carolina sent three delegates to the First Continental Congress. One of them was Joseph Hewes. The real aim of this congress was to restore harmony between the American colonies and Great Britain. But Hewes advocated independence because of his previous activities. It was very difficult for Hewes to express his opinion in the Continental Congress without being laughed at or insulted. Hewes rarely had the opportunity to speak in Congress. For this he was very active in the formed committees, most of which favored independence. Hewes in North Carolina was also elected to the Second Continental Congress in 1775, where he served for four years. In early 1776, Joseph Hewes was appointed the first naval minister of the thirteen colonies. With the authority he was given, he formed the cornerstone of the American Navy. He was also involved in a secret committee that demanded the independence of the colonies. Hewes was one of the main reasons why North Carolina demanded independence over all other colonies. Without Joseph Hewes, the Declaration of Independence would never have been signed. This was signed by 56 delegates on July 4, 1776. Because of his declining health, Hewes retired to his New Jersey mansion. Regardless of his health problems, he ran for re-election in Congress. He was not re-elected. On October 29, 1779, he had his last appearance in Congress and on November 10, he died.
His funeral took place the next day. Members of the General Assembly of Pennsylvania, the President of the Supreme Executive Council, the Plenipotentiary Ambassador of France and a number of citizens came to pay their respects to this great man. To honor the memory of Joseph Hewes, the congress participants wore a mourning band on their left arm for a month.
The last years of his life were written down in the diary kept by Joseph Hewes. He wrote that he was a sad and lonely man. He never wanted to be a bachelor. But his beloved bride died unexpectedly before the wedding feast in 1766. Therefore, he had never married and had no children to whom he could leave his money and his possessions.


USS JOSEPH HEWES (AP-50)

Ship biography

The USS JOSEPH HEWES (AP-50) is the first ship in the US Navy to be named in honor of one of the founding fathers of the United States of America, Joseph Hewes.
The troop transport ship is the first ship from the JOSEPH HEWES class.
The passenger ship with a displacement of 9359 GRT was built in 1930 on the New York Shipbuilding Company in Camden, New Jersey. At his christening the ship was named SS EXCALIBUR.
The US Navy acquired the ship on January 8, 1942 and had it converted into a troop transport ship. Captain Robert McLanahan Smith, Jr. (1896 - November 11, 1942) placed the ship under his command called the USS JOSEPH HEWES into service with the US Navy on May 1, 1942. After completion of the renovation and equipment, the ship was moved to Hampton Roads, Virginia on October 24, 1942. There the troop transport was integrated into Task Group 34.8, the northern attack group during Operation "Torch". In addition to the USS JOSEPH HEWES, there were seven other troop transport ships in this TG, which were used by the destroyers USS PARKER, USS ROE (DD-418), USS LIVERMORE (DD-429), USS KEARNY (DD-432) and USS ERICSSON (DD -440) were secured. There were also the battleship USS TEXAS (BB-35) and the light cruiser USS SAVANNAH (CL-42), which provided fire support to this combat group, and the two escort carriers USS SANGAMON (CVE-26) and USS CHENANGO (CVE-28) those of the destroyers USS HAMBLETON, USS MACOMB, USS DALLAS (DD-199) and USS EBERLE (DD-430), the oil tanker USS KENNEBEC (AO-36), the mine sweepers USS RAVEN (AM-55) and USS OSPREY (AM -56), the aircraft tender USS BARNEGAT (AVP-10) and the submarine USS SHAD (SS-235). On October 28, the units of the task force left the American coast and reached their areas of operation on November 7, 1942. For TG 34.8 it was Mehedya and Port Lyautey. On the morning of the following day, the attack by the invasion fleet began. The invading fleet commanded Rear Adm. Henry Kent Hewitt (February 11, 1887 - September 15, 1972). Before the attack, the USS JOSEPH HEWES still had 80 officers and 1,074 soldiers from the 3rd Division, as well as vehicles and accessories.
Task Group 34.8 began Operation Goalpost on November 8th. At around 7:05 am, the first troops from the USS JOSEPH HEWES landed on Moroccan soil. After that, the unloading of ammunition and supplies began. Around noon on November 11th this was completed and the first 30 wounded in the fight were put on the troop transport ship.
On the evening of November 11, 1942, U-173, Commander Oberleutnant zur See Hans-Adolf Schweichel (May 26, 1915 - November 16, 1942) sneaked into the vicinity of the ships lying in the roadstead. Commander Schweichel had three torpedoes fired at the anchored ships between 19:48 and 19:56. Three detonations were noticed on the submarine. Visual observations could not be made because the submarine was already diving. Each of the torpedoes had hit.
The first torpedo hit the troop carrier USS JOSEPH HEWES (AP-50). Desperate attempts were made to drive the ship to the beach, but the forecastle took in water far too quickly and the propellers looked out of the water. Captain Robert McLanahan Smith, Jr. then gave orders to leave the ship. He and over 100 crew members and soldiers lost their lives while the ship sank in the floods.

The second torpedo hit the oil tanker USS WINOOSKI (AO-38) and the third torpedo hit the destroyer USS HAMBLETON (DD-455) amidships.


USS JOSEPHHEWES (AP 50)
Commanding officer

Captain Robert McLanahan Smith, Jr. May 1, 1942 - November 11, 1942

This post was filed under troop ship on by Thomas.

USS EMMONS (DD-457)

biography

George Foster Emmons
* August 23, 1811 in Clarendon, Vermont
† July 23, 1884 in Princeton, New Jersey
was a Rear Admiral in the US Navy, participated in the Wilkes Exploring Expedition, served in the Mexican-American War, the American Civil War, and was present at the formal occupation of Alaska

George Foster Emmons began his notable career as a midshipman on April 1, 1828. On board the war corvette USS PEACOCK (1813) he took part in the Wilkes Exploring Expedition. This was led by Lieutenant Charles Wilkes (April 3, 1798 - February 8, 1877). On August 18, 1838, the expedition left Hampton Roads, Virginia. The ports called were Madeira, Rio de Janeiro, Tierra del Fuego in the Strait of Magellan. Ports in Chile and Peru, the Tuamotu Archipelago, the islands of Samoa and New South Wales were visited. The port of Sydney in Australia was called and in December 1839 they sailed into the Antarctic Ocean as far as the ice allowed. From there, on January 25, 1840, the Antarctic continent west of the Balleny Islands was sighted. The expedition then sailed north and visited the Fiji Islands and Hawaii in mid-1840. In March 1841 they sailed north again and reached the west coast of North America on the Strait of Juan de Fuca, which later became the international border between Canada and the USA. In Puget Sound, now modern Portland, Oregon, Lieutenant Emmons was brought ashore with some sailors. Wilkes had given him the task of looking for an inland route from Puget Sound to San Francisco Bay. The troop headed south along the Siskiyou Trail. Among other things, Mount Shasta in Northern California was discovered. In the San Francisco Bay the squadron waited for this troop around Emmons. After the expedition was complete again, they sailed back into the Pacific and visited the island of Wake. The journey home was started via the Philippines, the Sulu Archipelago, Borneo, Singapore, Polynesia and the Cape of Good Hope. On June 10, 1842 they reached New York again. Emmons then served with great honors in the Mexican-American War and the American Civil War. In the meantime Emmons was promoted to captain and was given command of the corvette USS OSSIPEE (1861) on October 27, 1866. He took the ship along the coast of Mexico and Central America to enforce American interests there. He left San Francisco on September 27, 1867. On board were among others the Russian negotiator Eduard Andrejewitsch Stöckl (1804 - 1892) and the American negotiator William Henry Seward (May 16, 1801 - October 10, 1872), who had signed a sales contract on March 30, 1867. Russia sold Alaska to the United States for $ 7.2 million. The ship's destination was Sitka, Alaska. There, on October 18, 1867, the area of ​​Alaska was officially celebrated with a change of flag. In 1868 Emmons was promoted to the Commodore. He was given the Hydrographic Office in 1870. In 1872 he was promoted to Rear Admiral and placed in command of the Philadelphia Navy Yard. He held this command until his retirement in 1873. Rear Admiral George Foster Emmons died on July 23, 1884 in Princeton, New Jersey. He was buried in Green Mount Cemetery in Baltimore, Maryland.

George Foster Emmons was married to Frances Antonia Thornton Emmons. They had three children.
Anthonia Thornton, born 1846
Frances Antonia born November 1850
George Thornton Emmons (June 6, 1852 - June 11, 1945)


USS EMMONS (DD-457)

Ship biography

The USS EMMONS (DD-457) is the first ship in the US Navy to be named in honor of Rear Adm. George Foster Emmons.
The destroyer is the twenty-third ship in the GLEAVES class.
The keel of the ship was laid on November 14, 1940 at the Bath Iron Works Corporation in Bath, Maine. Mrs. F. E. Reacock, granddaughter of Rear Adm. George Foster Emmons, christened the ship on August 23, 1941 before it was launched. Commander Thomas Cameron Ragan (January 21, 1904 - November 7, 1990) put the ship under his command into service with the US Navy on December 5, 1941.
After the complete equipment in the Norfolk Navy Yard, the USS EMMONS left there together with the USS HAMBLETON on January 31, 1942 for a test and training voyage. There was a trip that was unique in wartime. Both ships crossed the Panama Canal and docked in the port of Callao, Peru. Peruvian officials embarked on board and the destroyer took them to the Chilean port of Valparaiso. After the Chilean port followed the ports of Guayaquil, Ecuador; Cartagena, Colombia and Balboa, Panama Canal Zone. After a hull inspection, the USS EMMONS was patrolling New England waters. The destroyer was then transferred to Task Force 36, which included the aircraft carrier USS RANGER (CV-4), the heavy cruiser USS AUGUSTA (CA-31) and the destroyers USS ELLYSON (DD-454), USS HAMBLETON (DD-455 ), USS MACOMB (DD-458) and USS RODMAN (DD-456). The TF ships left the port of Newport, Rhode Island on April 22nd. The USS RANGER had a load of aircraft loaded. In the port of Accra, in the West African country of Ghana, the association docked on May 10th and 68 pilots launched their Curtiss P-40 fighters. These were intended for use in the theater of war in North Africa. The TF 36 ships returned to the east coast of the USA on May 28th. Immediately afterwards, the USS EMMONS began patrols off Naval Station Argentia, Newfoundland, for a few days. A new order sent the ship to Boston Harbor, where troopships waited to be escorted to Halifax, Nova Scotia. On July 5, the USS EMMONS set sail with the heavy cruiser USS TUSCALOOSA (CA-37) and the destroyers USS HAMBLETON, USS MACOMB and USS RODMAN and these troop carriers and cargo ships again in Halifax and escorted them to Iceland July were expected by British escort units. The USS EMMONS and the other warships that escorted the troop transport were transferred to US Task Force 99, which was integrated into the British Home Fleet. They reached Scapa Flow, Orkney Islands, Scotland on July 16. There, the crew members of the American and British ships completed training to coordinate tactics. From July 26 to 31, the USS EMMONS accompanied the British battleship HMS DUKE of YORK (17) to Iceland and back together with the USS HAMBLETON. The destroyer was then given the task of patrolling the Scottish coast. On August 13, the USS EMMONS left the coast of Scapa Flow together with the heavy cruiser USS TUSCALOOSA, the American destroyer USS RODMAN and the British destroyer HMS ONSLAUGHT (G04) for Iceland. A convoy awaited them there, which was to be escorted through the treacherous North Sea shipping routes. The cargo ships had loaded material and torpedoes for two squadrons of Hampden bombers belonging to the RAF Bomber Command. In addition, there were ground staff on board the ships. The convoy drove to Murmansk, northern Russia. The British destroyers HMS Marne (G35) and HMS MARTIN (G44) as well as the Soviet destroyers GREMYASHCHI and SOKRUSHITELNY awaited the convoy off the Kola peninsula. After unloading the material for the bombers, the ships set sail again on August 24th. The empty cargo ships are escorted by the USS TUSCALOOSA, USS EMMONS and USS RODMAN. Four days after the ships had cast off, they met survivors of the convoy PQ 17. With them they reached Scapa Flow four days later. The USS EMMONS and the other two American warships continued from there and docked in the port of Greenock, Scotland on August 30th. The ships' lay times were very short. No enemy submarines were sighted on the way home to the east coast, and they docked in New York Harbor on September 9th.
For the coming invasion of the North African coast, the crews of several American warships were trained in the Casco, the Chesapeake Bay and the Bermuda Islands. The USS EMMONS left Bermuda waters on October 16 and drove to Hampton Roads, Virginia, where the ship was integrated into Task Group 34.10. This task group was the southern attack group during Operation Torch. During this operation, Task Group 34.10 was supposed to capture the attack on Safi, French - Morocco, held by French associations of the Vichy government. This Task Group 34.10, which was commanded by Rear Adm. Lyal Ament Davidson (December 12, 1886 - December 29, 1950) included the battleship USS NEW YORK (BB-34) and the light cruiser USS PHILADELPHIA (CL-41), the by the destroyers USS BEATTY, USS MERVINE (DD-489) and USS KNIGHT (DD-633). Five transport ships and one freighter within the TF formed the UGF 1 convoy and were used by the destroyers USS QUICK, USS COWIE (DD-632), USS DORAN (DD-634), USS COLE (DD-155) and USS BERNADOU (DD- 153) accompanied. In addition, a mine-layer, two rapid minesweepers, two tankers, the submarine USS BARB (SS-220), a tug and the escort carrier USS SANTEE (CVE-29) were in this TF, which was covered by the USS EMMONS and USS RODMAN. On the evening of the 7thOn November 1st, the TF ships reached their starting positions off the North African coast and began preparations for the landings the following morning. The USS EMMONS and the USS RODMAN stayed with the USS SANTEE, whose aircraft supported the invading forces. The three ships will remain in front of Safi until November 13th. Then the USS EMMONS and the USS RODMAN escort the escort aircraft carrier across the Bermuda Islands in the port of Norfolk. The USS EMMONS leaves from there to the Boston Navy Yard, where the destroyer had to undergo an overhaul. After this, the destroyer cast off again and drove together with the USS RODMAN and the USS MACOMB to Christobal, Panama Canal to accompany a convoy from there to New York. The destroyer was then moved to a convoy to bring supplies to the North African coast. In February, the ships cast off for it. On March 11th, the USS EMMONS reached New York again. Training for the ship's crew began there. The ship itself was transferred to the task force commanded by Rear Admiral Olaf Mandt Hustvedt (June 23, 1886 - December 22, 1978). This TF also contains the two battleships USS SOUTH DAKOTA (BB-57) and USS ALABAMA (BB-60), the heavy cruisers USS TUSCALOOSA and USS AUGUSTA, the USS RODMAN, USS ELLYSON, USS MACOMB and another destroyer. These ships were to be deployed together with the British Home Fleet in Scapa Flow. The destroyer set sail with the TF ships on April 2 and drove to the Naval Station in Argentia, where they docked on April 5. There the ships and crews were prepared for use with the British fleet. The TF warships left the American continent on May 12th and were supposed to monitor the Allied convoys from Iceland to Murmansk and back from Scapa Flow. In addition, the two battleships and the heavy cruisers were supposed to lure the German battleship TIRPITZ and other enemy surface ships from their safe Norwegian bases to the open sea and force them to fight. Operation “Camera” begins on July 8th off Norway, with the aim of distracting from the operation “Husky” in Sicily. But this operation "Camera" is a complete failure because the German reconnaissance did not record the ship's targets. The reason for this were terrible storms in the Atlantic. From July 26th to 29th, this lure maneuver was repeated under the code name "Gouvenor". This time the Atlantic was calmer again and the German reconnaissance was active again. Five of the launched German reconnaissance aircraft were shot down. On their way home to the east coast of the USA, the warships first headed for Iceland. Due to the previous storms, a lot of icebergs were heading south. Shortly before entering the protective port of Hvalfjord, the destroyer USS ELLYSON came close to an iceberg during a maneuver and was slashed. This iceberg tore a 1 x 6 meter leak in the bow of the ship. American Seabees repaired the ship in an astonishingly short time, because on August 9, all TF ships docked in Norfolk. Together with the USS RODMAN and the USS MACOMB, the USS EMMONS then patrolled Argentia until September 1. A month of rest for the ship's crew followed. After that, all three destroyers drove to Norfolk where more ships were waiting for them. Together with the destroyers USS HALL (DD-583), USS HALLIGAN (DD-584), USS WILLIAM D PORTER (DD-579), USS YOUNG (DD-580), USS MACOMB, USS RODMAN and USS ELLYSON escorted the USS EMMONS the newly built battleship USS IOWA (BB-61) on its way to Casablanca, French Morocco. These ships left the US east coast in mid-November. US President Franklin Delano Roosevelt (January 30, 1882 - April 12, 1945), Secretary of State Cordell Hull (October 2, 1871 - July 23, 1955), the Chief of Naval Operations Admiral Ernest Joseph King (November 23 1878 - June 25, 1956) and other high-ranking military personnel aboard the USS IOWA. She wanted to attend the Cairo Conference from November 22nd to 26th with British Prime Minister Winston Leonard Spencer Churchill (November 30, 1874 - January 24, 1965) and the Chinese General Chiang Kai-shek (October 31, 1887 - April 5 1975) take part. Then they flew to Iran to take part in the Tehran Conference from November 28 to December 1, 1943 with the Soviet General Secretary Josef Wissarionowitsch Stalin (December 18, 1878 - March 5, 1953). During the Tehran conference, the coming post-war regulations should be discussed. After reaching Casablanca, the destroyers began patrolling these waters with anti-submarine patrols. After the conclusion of the Tehran Conference, the USS HALL, USS HALLIGAN, USS MACOMB, USS EMMONS, USS RODMAN, USS ELLYSON and USS IOWA passed through the ports of Dakar, Senegal; Freetown, Sierra Leone; Bahia, Brazil; Port Royal, South Carolina to Boston, where they docked on December 19th. The aircraft carrier USS RANGER was again waiting in the port of Newport to bring planes to Accra. In addition to the USS RODMAN, the USS EMMONS and the USS MACOMB, the heavy cruiser USS TUSCALOOSA, three other destroyers and the naval tanker USS CHICIPEE (AO-34) were also on this voyage. On January 8, 1943, the warships left Newport. The port of Accra was reached on January 19th. There all Curtiss P-40 fighters that were carried with them started again, whose targets were the Middle East, India and Burma. The Small Fleet then cast off again and returned safely to Hampton Roads on January 30th. This small fleet had to cast off again on February 14th to escort the USS RANGER to Accra. The aircraft carrier this time had 72 Curtiss P-40 fighters. The ships needed ten days to cross the West African coast. After the planes took off on February 24, the association cast off again and headed for the east coast, where it moored again on March 6, 1943 in Hampton Roads.
After a brief overhaul at the Boston Navy Yard and refilling of the magazines and fuel tanks, the USS EMMONS cast off on April 19 and drove to New York, where the destroyers of DESDIV 21 gathered. In addition to the USS EMMONS, this destroyer division included the USS ELLYSON, USS GLEAVES (DD-423), USS NIELDS (DD-616), USS MACOMB, USS HAMBLETON (DD-455), USS RODMAN, and USS HILARY P JONES (DD -427). On April 21, the destroyers cast off and on May 2, these ships reached the port of Oran and began to perform escort and patrol duties along the North African coast. Before Cape Tenes, Algeria on May 14th, U-616, Commander Oberleutnant zur See Siegfried Koitschka (August 6, 1917 - May 17, 2002), the British tanker GS WALDEN (10,627 GRT) and the British from the convoy GUS 39 Cargo ship FORT FIEDLER (7,127 GRT) torpedoed. Both ships only suffered damage and were able to continue their voyage. In Oran, two US destroyer groups were then alerted to begin the hunt for U-616. In the first group, in addition to the USS EMMONS, were the USS ELLYSON, USS HAMBLETON, USS RODMAN and USS HILARY P JONES. The second group included the USS NIELDS, USS GLEAVES, and the USS MACOMB. On the night of May 14-15, the USS ELLYSON began its first depth charge, but contact with the submarine was broken afterwards. It was not until the night of May 16-17 that a Wellington "K" from RAF Squadron 36 located the submarine that had surfaced and brought the destroyers to it. They sink it the following morning. On May 18, the USS EMMONS and a number of the American destroyers left the Mediterranean again for Plymouth, Great Britain. The final preparations for the invasion of Normandy were made there. The USS EMMONS was one of the support forces for the "Omaha Beach" section. The Commander of Force C was Rear Admiral DeBryantyo, in which, in addition to the USS EMMONS, were the battleships USS TEXAS (BB-35) and USS ARKANSAS (BB-33), the British light cruiser HMS GLASGOW (C21), the French cruiser FFS MONTCALM and FFS GEORGES LEYGUES, the American destroyers USS McCOOK (DD-496), USS McCORMICK (DD-223), USS DOYLE (DD-494), USS BALDWIN (DD-624), USS HARDING (DD-625), USS SATTERLEE (DD-626) and USS THOMPSON (DD-627) and the British destroyers HMS MELBREAK (L73), HMS TANATSIDE (L69) and HMS TALYBONT (L18). On June 6, the Allied forces began attacking the French coast in Normandy. For three days, the USS EMMONS stayed in the front row of the ships present and monitored the air and sea around the cargo and amphibious ships in the roadstead in front of the bridgehead. The destroyer then escorted the battleship USS TEXAS through the English Channel to Plymouth. The USS EMMONS returned to the combat area on June 11th. The ship guarded the transport and supply ships from submarine attacks. From June 21 to June 24, the destroyer's oil and ammunition bunkers were replenished in the port of Portland, England. On June 24th, the destroyer was transferred to Task Force 129. In and around the French city of Cherbourg on the Atlantic coast, a fierce battle raged for every meter since June 14th. To defend the Atlantic port, the Germans built a fortification west and east of the city. This could not be destroyed either from the land or from the air. Therefore, two attack groups of the US Navy were moved in front of the city. Group I, commanded by Rear Adm. Morton Lyndholm Deyo (July 1, 1887 - November 10, 1973) included the battleship USS NEVADA, the heavy cruisers USS TUSCALOOSA and USS QUINCY (CA-71), the British cruisers HMS GLASGOW (C21) and HMS ENTERPRISE (D52) and the destroyers USS EMMONS, USS ELLYSON, USS RODMAN, USS MURPHY, USS HAMBLETON and USS GHERARDI (DD-637). This group was in front of the western bunker at Querqueville. Group II, commanded by Rear Adm. Daniel Edward Barbey (December 23, 1889 - March 11, 1969) included the battleships USS TEXAS, USS ARKANSAS (BB-33) and the destroyers USS PLUNKETT, USS BARTON, USS O'BRIEN, USS LAFFEY and USS HOBSON (DD-464). This group of ships lay in front of the eastern bunkers which had been given the name "Hamburg". After Group I had taken up their positions on June 25th and sighted the facilities to be bombarded, the order to fire was given. Until then it was still a nice and quiet day. Then all hell broke loose. Everything in the fortified buildings was shot at. Whether tanks, bunkers or gun emplacements. The German gun crews were not so easy to get down. Her grenades almost always hit the mark. The USS QUINCY came under heavy fire. In order to make the ship invisible from its opponents, the USS ELLYSON had to put a smoke screen around the heavy cruiser. Cherbourg, a key to the overall success of the Normandy invasion, fell two days later.
After a short break, the USS EMMONS left the English Atlantic coast together with the USS ELLYSON and the destroyers of the DESRON 10 and drove to Mers-el-Kebir, Algeria, where they docked on July 10th. The destroyers had escorted a transport convoy from Portland. Preparations were made for the invasion of the southern French coast in the Mediterranean ports occupied by the Allied forces. The USS EMMONS escorted several transport ships from the North African coast to the Sicilian port of Palermo. From there the destroyer began its patrol trips. In preparation for the invasion of the southern French coast, the ship went to Taranto, Italy, where the torpedoes were unloaded. For the invasion, the USS EMMONS was transferred to Task Force 85, whose code name was "Delta" and was commanded by Rear Admiral Bertram Joseph Rodgers (March 19, 1894 - November 30, 1983). This TF also contained the TF's flagship, the seaplane tender USS BISCAYNE (AVP-11), the battleships USS TEXAS (BB-35) and USS NEVADA (BB-36), the American light cruiser USS PHILADELPHIA and the French cruisers FFS MONTCALM and FFS GEORGES LEYGUES, the French large destroyers FFS LE FANTASQUE, FFS LE TERRIBLE and FFS LE MALIN and the American destroyers USS FORREST (DD-461), USS RODMAN, USS ELLYSON, USS FITCH, USS HAMBLETON, USS MACOMB and USS HOBSON . These ships provided fire support for the DropShips and were commanded by Rear Adm. Carleton Fanton Bryant (November 29, 1892 - April 11, 1987). 6 troop transport ships (AP), 2 amphibious assault cargo ships (AKA), 1 infantry landing ship (LSI), 23 armored landing craft (LST), 34 infantry landing craft (LCI), 52 armored landing craft (LCT), 9 mechanized landing craft (LCM), 5 control landing craft (LCC), 52 vehicle or personal landing craft (LCVP), 1 patrol boat (PC), 5 submarine hunter boats (SC), 8 mine sweepers, 1 LSP, 1 LSG, 2 LCG, 2 LCF, 12 LCS, 2 LCM (R), 1 FT , 10 tugs and rescue ships transported the soldiers of the 45th Infantry Division commanding Major General Eagle. The invasion began at dawn on August 15, 1944 in the bay near St. Raphael. Following the minesweepers, all warships began bombarding any enemy targets near the coast. The accuracy was very high and the landing troops hardly received any resistance.
The USS EMMONS then continued its patrols off the French coast to cover the landings of reinforcements of the Allies. This support continued well into October. Together with the destroyers USS HAMBLETON, USS RODMAN, USS ELLYSON, USS MACOMB, USS FORREST, USS FITCH, USS HOBSON, USS GHERHARDI, USS BUTLER (DD-636), USS JEFFERS (DD-621) and USS HARDING (DD-625 ) the USS EMMONS left the Mediterranean at the end of October. The destination of all of these warships was the east coast of the United States. The USS EMMONS docked in the Boston Navy Yard on November 8th. There the destroyer was converted into a high-speed minesweeper. For this purpose, the ship received the classification symbol DMS and the identification number 22 on November 15. After the conversion, a speed study was carried out outside the Boston harbor. The ship had no ammunition loaded and all unnecessary material had been removed. The shipyard in Kearny stated that the destroyer had a maximum speed of 35 knots. After the completion of all work and the training of the ship's crew with their ship in Chesapeake Bay, the USS EMMONS cast off on January 3, 1945 in the port of Norfolk. The ship's destination was the Pacific. The destroyer and minesweeper belonged to Minesweeping Squadron 20, which included the USS HAMBLETON, USS RODMAN, USS ELLYSON, USS MACOMB, USS FORREST, USS FITCH, USS HOBSON, USS GHERHARDI, USS BUTLER, USS JEFFERS and USS HARDING. After crossing the Panama Canal, the ships reached the California coast in January. There, as well as later in Hawaiian waters, several mine-hunting and firing exercises were carried out. In early March, the USS EMMONS and Mine Squadron 20 ships cast off from Perl Harbor and headed west. These ships belonged to Task Group 52.2, commanded by Rear Admiral Alexander Sharp, Jr. (1885-1975). The first destination was Ulithi Atoll where the ships of Task Force 52 were waiting. The destination of this TF was the coast of Okinawa. These reached the ships on March 24th and immediately began to search for mines off the beaches of Kerama Retto. The invasion of Okinawa began on April 1st. Like all other minesweepers in the squadron, the USS EMMONS took on both mine search and aerial surveillance for the battleships and cruisers in the task force. In the following weeks, the TG 52.2 had to pay a heavy toll for this. Of the twelve destroyers and minesweepers, only three ships remained undamaged.
On April 6, between 3:30 a.m. and 9:30 a.m., the ships of mine sweeping squadron 20 were attacked four times by Japanese kamikaze planes. A total of 198 kamikaze pilots took off from Kyushu, 55 were shot down by the American fighter guards, 35 from the anti-aircraft batteries on the ships, 41 returned to their base and 67 pounced on the American ships. The USS EMMONS and the USS RODMAN were subjected to a massive kamikaze attack during the first attack. The first Japanese aircraft that wanted to pounce on the USS RODMAN could still be shot down by the anti-aircraft crew on the USS EMMONS. Then more ships from the squadron appeared and shot down many of the kamikaze pilots. But then five of them pounced on the USS EMMONS. One aircraft hit the bridge, another starboard, one aft near the carriage number 3 at the level of the waterline, one on the port side where the combat control center was. A sea of ​​flames developed and ammunition exploded. The ship's crew fought heroically and desperately for their ship. But they lost this fight. 60 crew members were killed and 77 were injured, some seriously. Lieutenant Commander Eugene Noble Foss II ordered the survivors to disembark. The following day the floating hull of the USS EMMONS was sunk so that it would not fall into enemy hands.


USS EMMONS (DD-457)
Commanding officer

CDR Thomas Cameron Ragan December 5, 1941 - October 10, 1942 (achieved VADM rank)
CDR Harold Millar Fleming October 10, 1942 - July 4, 1943
LCDR Edward Baxter Billingsley July 4, 1943 - April 1December 1944 (achieved rank RADM)
LCDR Eugene Noble Foss II December 1, 1944 - April 6, 1945
LT John J. Griffin, Jr. April 6, 1945 - April 7, 1945

This entry was posted in Destroyer on by Thomas.

USS MOCAMB (DD-458)

biography

The destroyer USS MACOMB (DD-458) is named in honor of Commodore William Henry Alexander Macomb and his first cousin Rear Adm. David Betton Macomb.

William Henry Alexander Macomb
Born June 6, 1819 in Detroit, Michigan
† August 12, 1872 in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania
Was a officer in the United States Navy and served during the American Civil War

William Henry Alexander Mocamb was the son of Major General Alexander Mocamb (April 3, 1782 - June 25, 1841) who was the commanding general of the United States Army from May 29, 1828 to June 25, 1841, and Janet Marshall Rucker. He was one of seven children. In 1834, the young Mocamb joined the United States Navy and was named a midshipman. On January 17, 1844, he married Maria Eiza Stanton in Fort Hamilton, New York. After serving on many ships, he was promoted to lieutenant in 1847. Mocamb served with honors during the American Civil War and was promoted to commander in 1862. He took part in river warfare along the Mississippi. On June 13, 1864, he placed the gunboat USS SHAMROCK (1863) under his command in the service of the US Navy. This ship was converted into a gunboat in the New York Navy Yard and was christened on March 17, 1863, by Miss Sallie Bryant, daughter of William Cullen Bryant, the editor-in-chief of the New York Evening Post, before being launched. With this ship, Macomb was incorporated into the North Atlantic Blockade Squadron that of Acting Rear Admiral Samuel Lee Phillips (February 13, 1812 - June 7, 1897) and, from October 12, 1864, of Rear Admiral David Dixon Porter (June 8, 1813 - June 13, 1897). February 1891) was commanded. Macomb received from Porter immediately after he took command of Plymouth to take North Carolina. For this he was given nine gunboats and one torpedo boat. Only a few Confederate troops defended the city, but they had a large number of cannons and coastal batteries. From October 29th to 31st, 1864, the battle raged for the city. Then the Confederates fled the city and left all their cannons to Mocamb and his troops. Mocamb later led an expedition up the Roanoke River in North Carolina. For his bravery shown during the battles he led against the Confederates, Mocamb was promoted to captain in 1866. Four years later, before leaving the US Navy, he was named Commodore. Macomb died in Philadelphia on August 12, 1872.

David Betton Macomb, Jr.
* February 27, 1827 in Tallahassee, Florida
† January 27, 1911 in New York
was an admiral and engineering officer in the US Navy, served during the American Civil War, and was a noted inventor.

The father of the young Macomb, David Betton Macomb, Sr. (*? - February 1837 by suicide), came from a well-known family who fought for the crown during the American War of Independence, but whose loyalty was on sides from the beginning of the 19th century the USA was. Young Macomb's grandfather was William Macomb (approx. 1751 - April 16, 1796), a merchant and politician from Upper Canada and the brother of Alexander Macomb (1748 - 1831), a merchant and land speculator. His father's cousin was the well-known Major General Alexander Macomb (April 3, 1782 - June 25, 1841). His mother, Mary Worthington Tiffin (*? - October 1836), was the daughter of Thomas Worthington (July 16, 1773 - June 20, 1827), who was the governor of Ohio. The young David Betton Macomb was the seventh child and was inducted into the US Navy as the third assistant engineer from Pennsylvania in January 1849. In February 1851 he was promoted to second assistant engineer and transferred to the coast guard cutter USS BIBB (1843). The planned North Pacific Exploring and Surveying Expedition, also known as the Ringgold - Rodgers Expedition, required experienced surveyors and their assistants. The commander of this expedition was Cadwalader Ringgold (August 20, 1802 - April 29, 1867) whose flags were hoisted on the brigantine USS PORPOISE (1836). Macomb was commanded aboard the steam tug USS JOHN HANCOCK (1850) under the command of Lieutenant John Rodgers (August 8, 1812 - May 5, 1882). In addition to the corvette USS VINCENNES (1826) there were two other ships in this squadron. The squadron left the port of Hampton Roads, Virginia on June 11, 1853 and set sail. At the stations Funchal, Madeira; Porto Praya, Cape Verde; Simonstown in False Bay, South Africa, the expedition stopped to get the most necessary food before the long journey across the Indian Ocean began. On December 12th, the squadron reached Batavia, Java and began to measure the waters around the large islands. In March 1854, they docked in Hong Kong, China, and began to measure the coast there. Commodore Matthew Calbraith Perry (April 10, 1794 - March 4, 1858) relieved Ringgold of his post and made him Lieutenant John Rodgers. The squadron now turned north to the Bering Sea and measured the coast there. From there the ships sailed without the USS PORPOISE, the ship probably sank after a typhoon between China and the island of Formosa, on the American coast to the south. In March 1856 they reached Puget Sound where the local army outpost and the white settlers were hurried to help against an Indian revolt. After returning to the United States, Macomb was promoted to first assistant engineer in June 1856 and transferred to the frigate USS WABASH (1855) which was the flagship of the home fleet on the east coast. Macomb married Augusta H. Pope in Kittery, Maine, in 1858. They had three children, one of whom died in infancy and one daughter died unmarried. In the same year Macomb moved on board the corvette USS SARANAC (1848), which was en route from the east coast to the west coast and joined the Pacific squadron. In 1861 Macomb was promoted to chief engineer aboard the frigate USS NIAGARA (1855). The ship had only returned from its diplomatic mission in Tokyo Bay on April 23, 1861 in Boston. The American Civil War was already in full swing. It broke out openly on April 12th. The US NIAGARA participated in the naval blockade off Charleston, South Carolina and participated in the bombing of the Pensacola Navy Yard. Macomb was transferred to the Boston shipyard in early 1862, where he was appointed superintendent to equip the monitors USS NAHANT (1862), USS NANTUCKET (1862) and USS CANONICUS (1863). After the USS CANONICUS was placed in the service of the US Navy by Commander E. G. Parrott on April 16, 1864, Macomb was transferred to the ship where he was the chief engineer. The ship initially belonged to the James River Flotilla and later to the North Atlantic Blockade Squadron, first operated by Rear Admiral David Dixon Porter (June 8, 1813 - February 13, 1891) and from April 28, 1865 by Acting Rear Admiral William Radford (September 9, 1809 - January 8, 1890). Mocamb was involved with this ship in the construction of the Dutch Gap and from 14 to 20 August 1864 in the battle of the Deep Bottom. In the same year the USS CANONICUS was transferred to the North Atlantic Blockade Squadron and took part in the Battle of Fort Fisher, North Carolina. The fort was captured on January 15, 1865, and that same night the USS CANONICUS steamed to Charleston, South Carolina with the monitor USS MONADNOCK (1863). In the early hours of February 18, the USS CANONICUS fired the last shot at the fort on Sullivan's Island before the Confederate troops escaped and the route to Charleston Harbor was clear. After the surrender of Charleston, the USS CANONICUS and the rest of the squadron were moved to pursue the Confederate ship CSS STONEWELL. On the hunt, the USS CANONICUS reached Havana where the Confederate ship was moored. The USS CANONICUS was the first American ironclad to enter a foreign port. The CSS STONEWELL had reached the port there after May 10th, 1865 and they learned about the end of the civil war there. It was immediately sold to the Spanish authorities there. After the Confederate ship posed no threat, the ironclad returned to the United States. It docked in Boston on June 26, 1865. Macomb was transferred to the Philadelphia Navy Yard where much of the armored fleet was anchored. His job was to carry out inspections on the ironclad ships. In 1866 he was transferred to the Pensacola Navy Yard and in 1868 to the Portsmouth Navy Yard. In 1871 he was transferred to the screw frigate USS TENNESSEE (1865) where he was named chief engineer for the entire North Atlantic Fleet from 1871 to 1873. In 1879 he returned to the Portsmouth Navy Yard and in 1882 ordered by Congress to be President of the Board Ordered so that the excess inventory of the Navy, mainly from the Civil War, could be surveyed and assessed and sold if necessary. In this duty he remained until 1883. Then he was transferred to the Boston Navy Yard where he remained until his retirement. He reached this retirement on February 27, 1889 with the rank of Commodore. He was later promoted to Rear Admiral a. D. He retired from his home in North Cambridge, Massachusetts. He died on January 27, 1911 in New York City.


USS MACOMB (DD-458)

Ship biography

The USS MACOMB (DD-458) is the first ship in the US Navy to be named in honor of Commodore William Henry Alexander Macomb and his first cousin Rear Adm. David Betton Macomb, Jr.
The destroyer is the twenty-fourth ship in the GLEAVES class.
On September 3, 1940, the keel of the ship was laid on the Bath Iron Works Corporation. Mrs. Mary Stanton Macomb Greene (October 11, 1873 - July 17, 1955), wife of Ryland Warriner Greene (July 24, 1872 - November 14, 1949) and her sister Mrs. Josepha Williams Macomb Chew (December 19, 1879 - November 10, 1949) February 1967), widow of Edward Hamel Chew (October 14, 1874 - March 24, 1923), both granddaughters of Commodore William Henry Alexander Macomb, christened the destroyer on September 23, 1941 before it was launched. Lieutenant Commander William Howard Duvall (October 12, 1904 - February 14, 1984) put the ship under his command into service with the US Navy on January 26, 1942.
After the test and training voyage along the US east coast, the USS MACOMB was transferred to Task Force 22. There, training and patrol tasks alternated in front of the Naval Station in Argentia, Newfoundland. The USS MACOMB then moved to Task Force 36, which also includes the aircraft carrier USS RANGER (CV-4), the heavy cruiser USS AUGUSTA (CA-31) and the destroyers USS EMMONS (DD-457), USS HAMBLETON (DD -455), USS RODMAN (DD-456). The TF ships left the port of Newport, Rhode Island on April 22nd. The USS RANGER had a load of aircraft loaded. In the port of Accra, the West African country of Ghana, the association docked on May 10th and 68 pilots took off their Curtiss P-40 fighters. These were intended for use in the theater of war in North Africa. The TF 36 ships returned to the east coast of the USA on May 28th. A new order sent the ship to the port of Boton, where troop ships waited to be escorted to Halifax, Nova Scotia. On July 5th, the USS MACOMB with the heavy cruiser USS TUSCALOOSA (CA-37) and the destroyers USS HAMBLETON, USS MACOMB and USS RODMAN and these troop carriers and cargo ships set off again in Halifax and escorted them to Iceland British escort units were expected on July 12th on July 12th. The USS MACOMB and the other warships that escorted the troop transport were transferred to US Task Force 99, which was integrated into the British Home Fleet. They reached Scapa Flow, Orkney Islands, Scotland on July 16. There, the crew members of the American and British ships completed training to coordinate tactics. The MACOMB was then given the task of patrolling the USS HAMBLETON between the Scottish and Icelandic coasts. On August 30, both destroyers were moored in the port of Greenock, Scotland, waiting for the USS TUSCALOOSA (CA-37) USS RODMAN and USS EMMONS. These warships, along with British destroyers, had escorted several cargo ships to the Kola Peninsula. On the same day, the American association cast off again in Greenock and drove towards the American east coast. No enemy submarines were sighted on the way home. On September 9, the association docked in New York Harbor, where it remained for further availability until September 25. For the coming invasion of the North African coast, the crews of several American warships were trained in the Casco, the Chesapeake Bay and the Bermuda Islands. The MACOMB left the waters of Bermuda on October 16 and drove to Hampton Roads, Virginia, where the ship was integrated into Task Group 34.8. This task group was the northern attack group during Operation Torch. Task Force 34 commanded Rear Adm. Henry Kent Hewitt (February 11, 1887 - September 15, 1972). Task Group 34.8 included the battleship USS TEXAS (BB-35) and the light cruiser USS SAVANNAH (CL-42), which provided fire support for this combat group. Eight transport ships of this TG were secured by the destroyers USS PARKER, USS ROE (DD-418), USS LIVERMORE (DD-429), USS KEARNY (DD-432) and USS ERICSSON (DD-440). In addition, the two escort carriers USS SANGAMON (CVE-26) and USS CHENANGO (CVE-28) were in this task group, those of the destroyers USS MACOMB, USS HAMBLETON, USS DALLAS (DD-199) and USS EBERLE (DD-430 ), the oil tanker USS KENNEBEC (AO-36), the minesweepers USS RAVEN (AM-55) and USS OSPREY (AM-56), the aircraft tender USS BARNEGAT (AVP-10) and the submarine USS SHAD (SS-235 ) were accompanied. On October 28, the units of the task force left the American coast and reached their areas of operation on November 7, 1942. For TG 34.8 it was Mehedya and Port Lyautey. On the morning of the following day, the attack by the invasion fleet began. Task Group 34.8 began with Operation Goalpost. The Allied landing forces were unsure of their position and thus delayed the landing of the second wave. The French defenders had thus gained time and were able to organize their resistance. Only through artillery fire and the support from the air from the escort carriers could the Allied troops fight their way to their goals and capture the defenders. The cargo and troop transport convoy GUF 1 returning to the east coast of the USA was divided into three groups. The USS MACOMB was transferred to Task Group 34.9. The convoy to be escorted consists of 10 troop carriers, 3 cargo ships, 3 mine-layers and 2 tankers. In addition to the USS MACOMB, the escort was formed by the light cruiser USS BROOKLYN (CL-40), the escort aircraft carrier USS CHENANGO and the destroyers USS BOYLE (DD-600), USS WOOLSEY (DD-437), USS SWANSON (DD-443), USS TILLMAN (DD-641), USS QUICK (DD-490), USS COLE (DD-155), USS KEARNY (DD-432) and USS PARKER (DD-604). From Norfolk, the USS MACOMB drove directly to the Boston Navy Yard, where its 1.1 inch battery was replaced by 40 mm and 20 mm cannons and the ship had to undergo an overhaul. After the completion of the conversion work, the destroyer cast off again and drove together with the USS EMMONS and the USS RODMAN to Christobal, Panama Canal to accompany a convoy from there to New York. Once there, both destroyers had to continue straight away. The destroyer was then moved to a convoy to bring supplies to the North African coast. In February, the ships cast off for it. On March 11th, the USS MACOMB reached New York again. Training for the ship's crew began there. The ship itself was transferred to the task force commanded by Rear Admiral Olaf Mandt Hustvedt (June 23, 1886 - December 22, 1978). This TF also contains the two battleships USS SOUTH DAKOTA (BB-57) and USS ALABAMA (BB-60), the heavy cruisers USS TUSCALOOSA and USS AUGUSTA, the USS EMMONS, USS ELLYSON, USS RODMAN and another destroyer. These ships were to be deployed together with the British Home Fleet in Scapa Flow. The destroyer set sail with the TF ships on April 2 and drove to the Naval Station in Argentia, where they docked on April 5. There the ships and crews were prepared for use with the British fleet. The TF warships left the American continent on May 12th and were supposed to monitor the Allied convoys from Iceland to Murmansk and back from Scapa Flow. In addition, the two battleships and the heavy cruisers were supposed to lure the German battleship TIRPITZ and other enemy surface ships from their safe Norwegian bases to the open sea and force them to fight. Operation “Camera” begins on July 8th off Norway, with the aim of distracting from the operation “Husky” in Sicily. But this operation "Camera" is a complete failure because the German reconnaissance did not record the ship's targets. The reason for this were terrible storms in the Atlantic. From the 26th to the 29thIn July this maneuver was repeated under the code name "Gouvenor". This time the Atlantic was calmer again and the German reconnaissance was active again. Five of the launched German reconnaissance aircraft were shot down. On their way home to the east coast of the USA, the warships first headed for Iceland. Due to the previous storms, a lot of icebergs were heading south. Except for the USS EMMONS, all other ships could bypass it. Amazingly, the USS EMMONS was repaired in record time and all TF ships docked in Norfolk on August 9th. Together with the USS EMMONS and the USS RODMAN, the USS MACOMB then went on patrols off Argentia until September 1. A month of rest for the ship's crew followed. After that, all three destroyers drove to Norfolk where more ships were waiting for them. The USS MACOMB escorted together with the destroyers USS HALL (DD-583), USS HALLIGAN (DD-584), USS WILLIAM D PORTER (DD-579), USS YOUNG (DD-580), USS EMMONS, USS RODMAN and USS ELLYSON the newly built battleship USS IOWA (BB-61) en route to Casablanca, French Morocco. These ships left the US east coast in mid-November. US President Franklin Delano Roosevelt (January 30, 1882 - April 12, 1945), Secretary of State Cordell Hull (October 2, 1871 - July 23, 1955), the Chief of Naval Operations Admiral Ernest Joseph King (November 23 1878 - June 25, 1956) and other high-ranking military personnel aboard the USS IOWA. She wanted to attend the Cairo Conference from November 22nd to 26th with British Prime Minister Winston Leonard Spencer Churchill (November 30, 1874 - January 24, 1965) and the Chinese General Chiang Kai-shek (October 31, 1887 - April 5 1975) take part. Then they flew to Iran to take part in the Tehran Conference from November 28 to December 1, 1943 with the Soviet General Secretary Josef Wissarionowitsch Stalin (December 18, 1878 - March 5, 1953). During the Tehran conference, the coming post-war regulations should be discussed. After reaching Casablanca, the destroyers began patrolling these waters with anti-submarine patrols. After the conclusion of the Tehran Conference, the USS HALL, USS HALLIGAN, USS MACOMB, USS EMMONS, USS RODMAN, USS ELLYSON and USS IOWA passed through the ports of Dakar, Senegal; Freetown, Sierra Leone; Bahia, Brazil; Port Royal, South Carolina to Boston, where they docked on December 19th. The aircraft carrier USS RANGER was again waiting in the port of Newport to bring planes to Accra. In addition to the USS MACOMB, the heavy cruiser USS TUSCALOOSA, the USS RODMAN and the USS EMMONS, two other destroyers and the naval tanker USS CHICIPEE (AO-34) were on this voyage. On January 8, 1943, the warships left Newport. The port of Accra was reached on January 19th. There all Curtiss P-40 fighters that were carried with them started again, whose targets were the Middle East, India and Burma. The Small Fleet then cast off again and returned safely to Hampton Roads on January 30th. This small fleet had to cast off again on February 14th to escort the USS RANGER to Accra. The aircraft carrier this time had 72 Curtiss P-40 fighters. The ships needed ten days to cross the West African coast. After the planes took off on February 24, the association cast off again and headed for the east coast, where it moored again on March 6, 1943 in Hampton Roads. After a brief overhaul at the Boston Navy Yard and refilling of the magazines and fuel tanks, the USS MACOMB cast off on April 19 and drove to New York, where the destroyers of DESDIV 21 gathered. In addition to the USS MACOMB, this destroyer division included the USS ELLYSON, USS GLEAVES (DD-423), USS NIELDS (DD-616), USS RODMAN, USS HAMBLETON, USS EMMONS, and USS HILARY P JONES (DD-427). On April 21, the destroyers cast off and on May 2, these ships reached the port of Oran and began to perform escort and patrol duties along the North African coast. Before Cape Tenes, Algeria on May 14th, U-616, Commander Oberleutnant zur See Siegfried Koitschka (August 6, 1917 - May 17, 2002), the British tanker GS WALDEN (10,627 GRT) and the British from the convoy GUS 39 Cargo ship FORT FIEDLER (7,127 GRT) torpedoed. Both ships only suffered damage and were able to continue their voyage. In Oran, two US destroyer groups were then alerted to begin the hunt for U-616. The first group included the USS RODMAN, USS ELLYSON, USS HAMBLETON, USS EMMONS, and USS HILARY P JONES. The second group included the USS MACOMB, the USS GLEAVES and the USS NIELDS. On the night of May 14-15, the USS ELLYSON began its first depth charge, but contact with the submarine was broken afterwards. It was not until the night of May 16-17 that a Wellington "K" from RAF Squadron 36 located the submarine that had surfaced and brought the destroyers to it. They sink it the following morning. On May 18th, many American destroyers left the Mediterranean for Plymouth, England to take part in the invasion of Normandy. The USS MACOMB remained in the Mediterranean area and carried out her patrol and escort trips there. In preparation for the invasion of the southern French coast, the ship went to Taranto, Italy, where the torpedoes were unloaded. For the invasion, the USS MACOMB was transferred to Task Force 85, whose code name was "Delta" and was commanded by Rear Admiral Bertram Joseph Rodgers (March 19, 1894 - November 30, 1983). This TF also contained the TF's flagship, the seaplane tender USS BISCAYNE (AVP-11), the battleships USS TEXAS (BB-35) and USS NEVADA (BB-36), the American light cruiser USS PHILADELPHIA and the French cruisers FFS MONTCALM and FFS GEORGES LEYGUES, the French large destroyers FFS LE FANTASQUE, FFS LE TERRIBLE and FFS LE MALIN and the American destroyers USS FORREST (DD-461), USS RODMAN, USS ELLYSON, USS FITCH, USS HAMBLETON, USS EMMONS and USS HOBSON . These ships provided fire support for the DropShips and were commanded by Rear Adm. Carleton Fanton Bryant (November 29, 1892 - April 11, 1987). 6 troop transport ships (AP), 2 amphibious assault cargo ships (AKA), 1 infantry landing ship (LSI), 23 armored landing craft (LST), 34 infantry landing craft (LCI), 52 armored landing craft (LCT), 9 mechanized landing craft (LCM), 5 control landing craft (LCC), 52 vehicle or personal landing craft (LCVP), 1 patrol boat (PC), 5 submarine hunter boats (SC), 8 mine sweepers, 1 LSP, 1 LSG, 2 LCG, 2 LCF, 12 LCS, 2 LCM (R), 1 FT , 10 tugs and rescue ships transported the soldiers of the 45th Infantry Division commanding Major General Eagle. The invasion began at dawn on August 15, 1944 in the bay near St. Raphael. Following the minesweepers, all warships began bombarding any enemy targets near the coast. The accuracy was very high and the landing troops hardly received any resistance.
The USS MACOMB then continued its patrols off the French coast to cover the landings of reinforcements of the Allies. This support continued well into October. Together with the destroyers USS HAMBLETON, USS RODMAN, USS ELLYSON, USS EMMONS, USS FORREST, USS FITCH, USS HOBSON, USS GHERHARDI, USS BUTLER (DD-636), USS JEFFERS (DD-621) and USS HARDING (DD-625 ) the USS MACOMB left the Mediterranean at the end of October. The destination of all of these warships was the east coast of the United States. The USS MACOMB docked in the Boston Navy Yard on November 8th. There the destroyer was converted into a high-speed minesweeper. For this purpose, the ship received the classification symbol DMS and the identification number 23 on November 15.
The following day, the USS MACOMB cast off from the shipyard and sailed for Norfolk. After the completion of all work and the training of the ship's crew with their ship in Chesapeake Bay, the USS MACOMB cast off on January 3, 1945 in the port of Norfolk. The ship's destination was the Pacific. The destroyer and minesweeper belonged to Minesweeping Squadron 20, which included the USS HAMBLETON, USS EMMONS, USS ELLYSON, USS RODMAN, USS FORREST, USS FITCH, USS HOBSON, USS GHERHARDI, USS BUTLER, USS JEFFERS and USS HARDING. After crossing the Panama Canal, the ships reached the California coast in January. There, as well as later in Hawaiian waters, several mine-hunting and firing exercises were carried out. In early March, the USS MACOMB and Mine Squadron 20 ships cast off from Perl Harbor and headed west. These ships belonged to Task Group 52.2, commanded by Rear Admiral Alexander Sharp, Jr. (1885-1975). The first destination was Ulithi Atoll where the ships of Task Force 52 were waiting. The destination of this TF was the coast of Okinawa. The TG 52.2 ships reached it on March 24th and immediately began to search for mines off the beaches of Kerama Retto. The invasion of Okinawa began on April 1st. Like all other minesweepers in the squadron, the USS MACOMB was responsible for minesweeping as well as air surveillance for the battleships and cruisers in the task force. In the following weeks, the TG 52.2 had to pay a heavy toll for this. Of the twelve destroyers and minesweepers, only three ships remained undamaged. On April 6, between 3:30 a.m. and 9:30 a.m., the ships of mine sweeping squadron 20 were attacked four times by Japanese kamikaze planes. A total of 198 kamikaze pilots took off from Kyushu, 55 were shot down by the American fighter guards, 35 from the anti-aircraft batteries on the ships, 41 returned to their base and 67 pounced on the American ships. The USS RODMAN and the USS EMMONS were subjected to a massive kamikaze attack during the first attack. Five kamikaze pilots pounced on the USS EMMONS. The USS MACOMB was one of the few ships from Mine Squadron 20 that was not damaged by Kamikaze pilots during this campaign. The destroyer and minesweeper was able to shoot down many aircraft. In the early morning hours of April 27, 1945, an enemy aircraft was seen on the radar. Then there were more and more. For an hour, the anti-aircraft gun crews fired almost continuously at the enemy aircraft while the ship maneuvered at full speed. The crew on the USS MACOMB managed to survive this air raid again without damaging the ship. On May 3rd, however, the streak of luck broke. As dusk was slowly approaching, Japanese kamikaze pilots began a night raid. The anti-aircraft gun crew was shooting down an enemy aircraft and it exploded in midair. Another enemy aircraft burst out of this cloud of explosion and pounced on the USS MACOMB. The ship suffered extensive damage. The USS MACOMB was able to drive to Saipan on its own, where the destroyer and minesweeper could be repaired. These repairs continued until after Japan's unconditional surrender. Together with the ships of the 3rd US Fleet, the USS MACOMB then set out for the main Japanese island. Shortly before the USS MISSOURI (BB-63) and USS IOWA (BB-61) entered Tokyo Bay on August 29, the USS MACOMB dropped its anchor after the mine search in this bay and witnessed the formal handing over of the surrender be.
On September 4th, the anchors of the destroyer and minesweeper were hoisted again and the USS MACOMB began to search for and destroy mines from the Japanese main island to Okinawa, in the entrance to the Yellow Sea and in Chosen Straits. The Japanese waters around Sasebo, Japan left the USS MACOMB on December 5, 1945 and sailed back to the east coast of the USA. After the ship had reached Norfolk, it was transferred back to the Atlantic Fleet. In June 1948 it received its new homeport in Charleston, South Carolina. By September 1949, the USS MACOMB began patrolling from there and took part in exercises along the east coast, the Canadian coast and in the Caribbean. On September 8, 1949, the ship began its first cruise in the Mediterranean after the Second World War. There the ship joined the 6th US fleet and returned to Charleston on October 13th. The second cruise in the Mediterranean lasted from March 20 to October 5, 1951 and the third cruise from April 22 to October 24, 1953. During each of these cruises, the USS MACOMB participated in exercises and operations with the US 6th Fleet . In addition, the ship supported the American diplomatic efforts to settle the unstable political situation in the eastern Mediterranean countries. The USS MACOMB was also present in the ports of other Mediterranean countries.
In July 1954 the destroyer and minesweeper were put into reserve and the ship was decommissioned on October 19, 1954. On the same day the Japanese Navy put this destroyer into service and named it JDS HATAHAZE (DD-182) . The ship served in the Maritime Self Defense Force. On February 1, 1970, the Japanese Navy returned the destroyer to the US Navy. On the same day, the USS MOCAMB was removed from the US Navy list. On August 6, 1970, the ship was handed over to the Taiwanese Navy. The destroyer was named ROCS HSIEN YANG (DD-16), the same name that the former sister ship USS RODMAN had carried in the Taiwanese Navy until 1969. After four years in service, the destroyer was taken out of service and used as a port training ship. It stayed there until 1978 when it was used as a spare part dispenser.


USS MACOMB (DD-458)
Commanding officer

LCDR William Howard Duvall January 26, 1942 - January 10, 1943 (achieved RADM rank)
LCDR Jerry Curtis South January 10, 1943 - March 2, 1944
LCDR George Hutchinson March 2, 1944 - December 7, 1944
LCDR Alton Louis Clifford Waldron December 7, 1944 - October 10, 1946
LCDR Thomas Andrew Turner October 10, 1946 - January 1, 1948
LCDR Robert Stephen Guy January 1, 1948 - February 1, 1948
LCDR Robert Elwin Cutts February 1, 1948 - June 1, 1948
LCDR William John Caspari September 1949 - September 1950
LCDR John Leroy Hutchinson October 1951 - October 1953

This entry was posted in Destroyer on by Thomas.

USS RODMAN (DD-456)

biography

Hugh Rodman
Born January 6, 1859 in Frankfort, Kentucky
† June 7, 1940 at Naval Hospital, Washington D.C.
was an officer in the United States Navy and served during the Spanish-American War and World War I, later serving as the commander of the US Pacific Fleet from 1919 to 1921

Hugh Rodman had been named a Cadet of the Seventh Congressional District of Kentucky in September 1875. During his time at the United States Naval Academy in Annapolis, he actively participated in all competitive sports. At that time it was understood to mean outdoor sports, that is, shooting, fishing and golf. He graduated from the academy in 1880. In the following years he served as Ensign on the gunboat USS YANTIC (1864) which was incorporated into the North Atlantic Station, the war sloop USS WACHUSETT (1861) and the war corvette USS HARTFORD (1858) which were subordinate to the Pacific Station. In 1883 Rodman attended the coronation of King David Kalākaua, born David Laʻamea Kamanakapuʻu Mahinulani Nalaiaehuokalani Lumialani Kalākaua, (November 12, 1836 - January 20, 1891) in Honolulu. He also served on the side-wheel gunboat USS MONOCACY (1864), the iron screw tug USS PALOS (1865), the sloop USS OMAHA (1869) and the wood screw steamer USS ESSEX (1874). These four ships were subordinate to the Asiatic Station. From 1889 Rodman was studying at the Naval Academy for a few months. He then worked for the Hydrographic Institute and the United States Naval Observatory until 1891. For the next four years, Rodman was involved in mapping the coastal areas of Alaska and British Columbia. To do this, he had to move ashore temporarily or circumnavigate the coastal areas on a coast guard steamer. Available were the Endeavor, the Bache, the Patterson and the Matchless. When the Spanish-American War broke out, he served on the protected cruiser USS RALEIGH (C-8). The ship had been on a Mediterranean cruise and docked in Hong Kong, where it was placed under the fleet of Admiral George Dewey (December 26, 1837 - January 16, 1917). Rodman served there on the front cannon during the Battle of Manila. He was the first ever to feel the enemy fire from the land batteries and the Spanish fleet. Due to his overview during the battle, it was he who brought the Spanish cruiser Castilla to sink with targeted shots. For his outstanding behavior during the Battle of Manila Bay on May 1, 1898 and during the capture of Manila City on August 13, 1898, he was commended by Captain Joseph Bulloch Coughlan, commander of the protected cruiser. In June 1899, Rodman disembarked the cruiser and took part in scientific explorations in the Pacific under the direction of Professor Alexander Emmanuel Rodolphe Agassiz (December 17, 1835 - March 27, 1910). On this expedition, Rodman was the executive officer and navigator on the Albatross, a US Fish Commission ship. In 1900 Rodman returned to Alaska for a year to conduct research for commercial fisheries. From 1901 to 1904 Rodman was in command of the war sloop USS IROQUOIS (1859) which was anchored in Honolulu, Hawaii.With this ship he sailed the Hawaiian waters until 1904. After this first command of a ship, Rodman stayed at Asiatic Station and went on board the light cruiser USS NEW ORLEANS (CL-22) for the next three years as executive officer Protected cruiser USS CINCINNATI (C-7) and on the battleship USS WISCONSIN (BB-9). In 1905 he was given command of the gunboat USS ELCANO (PG-38) with which he patrolled the Yangtze River. A year later Rodman was transferred to the armored cruiser USS WEST VIRGINIA (ACR-5) where he was part of the staff of the Commander in Chief of the Asiatic Fleet. This armored cruiser was the flagship of the Asiatic Fleet. Hugh Rodman returned to the United States in June 1907 and attended Naval War College in Newport, Rhode Island for two years. In addition to his studies, Rodman was a lighthouse inspector in the 6th Naval District, based in Charleston, South Carolina. At the beginning of 1909 he returned to the Far East. For six months he was the commanding officer at Naval Station Yard in Cavite, Philippine Islands. On June 30, 1909, he took command of the armored cruiser USS CLEVELAND (C-19) which was anchored in Cavite. He transferred this ship to the west coast of the USA and brought it to the Mare Island Naval Shipyard, Vallejo, California. Rodman took over the duty as an inspection officer over the cruiser there on September 26th. After the completion of the work, he took over command of the shipyard, which he held until December 27, 1911. The following January he was transferred to the flagship of the Atlantic Fleet, the battleship USS CONNECTICUT (BB-18) and given command of the ship. But already at the beginning of October 1912 Rodman took command of the battleship USS DELAWARE (BB-28) which on October 14th a fleet survey by US President William Howard Taft (September 15, 1857 - March 8, 1930) and US Secretary of the Navy George von Lengerke Meyer (June 24, 1858 - March 9, 1918). These could be shown to the Panama Canal, which is still under construction. Rodman later crossed the Atlantic on the USS DELAWARE. The ship stopped in the port of Villa France and he paid a courtesy visit to France. Further courtesy visits followed in England, Holland, Germany, Austria, Switzerland and Italy. After Hugh Rodman returned to the United States, he was appointed Marine Superintendent for the Panama Canal. He arrived there in January 1914 and was initially only in an advisory capacity to the first civilian governor of the Panama Canal Zone, George Washington Goethals (June 29, 1858 - January 21, 1928), who himself had been major general in building the canal since 1906. Rodman was then given the task of working out the rules and regulations for ships using the canal and for those who operate and organize it. In October 1915, Rodman was relieved of this post and given command of the battleship USS NEW YORK (BB-34), which was on the east coast. After a year he was released from his command and transferred to Washington D.C. where he was a member of the Board of Directors of the US Navy. That same year, Rodman was given the job of administrative director of the Panama Railway. After the United States of America entered the First World War on April 6, 1917, Rodman was appointed Rear Admiral. He was given command of Division Three of the Atlantic Fleet. During the war he served as division commander in various squadrons. He was on the battleships USS RHODE ISLAND (BB-17), USS MISSOURI (BB-11) and USS CONNECTICUT (BB-18) which were the flagships of the individual squadrons one after the other. It was not until the division commander of Battleship Division 9 of the Atlantic Fleet that Rodman had his own flagship. That was the USS NEW YORK (BB-34). This Squadron was sent to European waters in late 1917 to join the British Grand Fleet at Scapa Flow. The American Squadron formed the 6th Combat Squadron. This Grand Fleet was under the command of the British Naval Admiral Sir David Richard Beatty, 1st Earl Beatty (January 17, 1871 - March 11, 1936). Rear Admiral Hugh Rodman commanded his combat squadron in the North Sea until the end of World War I, covering an area of ​​76 miles between Scapa Flow and Edinburgh. For this service he was awarded the Order of the Bath by the British King George V. Rodman was present in Portland at the surrender of the German fleet and brought US President Thomas Woodrow Wilson (December 28, 1856 - February 3, 1924) with his flagship to the Peace Conference from Portland to Brest, France. After Rodman returned to New York with his combat squadron, he was transferred to the Pacific Fleet, where he took over the post of commander-in-chief. In addition, he was given command of Squadron 4 of the 8th Division and the battleship USS NEW MEXICO (BB-40) as the flagship. He held this office until July 1, 1919 and then moved to Hampton Roads, Virginia where he took command of the Fifth Naval District of the Naval Operating Base. He interrupted this command between 1921 and 1922 for an important duty assigned to him. He traveled to Peru on a mission as Plenipotentiary Minister and Envoy Extraordinary. From 1922 to 1923, Hugh Rodman served as a senior member of the board of directors responsible for formulating an administrative policy for all Naval Store Station administrations upon reaching retirement age at 64. In January 1923, Rodman retired after reaching the statutory retirement age and took his pension. In June 1923, Rodman accompanied US President Warren Gamaliel Harding (November 2, 1865 - August 2, 1923) on an extensive journey through the Alaska Territory. This trip ended in San Francisco, California on August 2nd where Harding passed away at the Palace Hotel. Rodman escorted the president's body to Washington D.C. where he was laid out. He also attended the late president's funeral in Marion, Ohio. On May 12, 1937, Rodman was sent to London as a representative of the US Navy to attend the coronation of George VI there. to attend. For this he was authorized by US Secretary of the Navy Claude Augustus Swanson (March 31, 1862 - July 7, 1939) to have his standard drawn up on his former flagship, the USS NEW YORK. With this battleship he was also involved in the royal fleet inspection on May 20th.
Admiral Rodman died on June 7, 1940 in Bethesda, Maryland. He was buried in Arlington National Cemetery.
Since 1889 he was married to Elizabeth Ruffin Sayro of Frankfort, Kentucky. She survived him by two years and lived in their home in Washington D.C.

Two ships were named by the US Navy in honor of Admiral Hugh Rodman.
The first ship was the GLEAVES class destroyer USS RODMAN (DD-456).
The second ship was the transport ship USS ADMIRAL HUGH RODMAN (AP-126) from the ADMIRAL BENSON WS-class.


USS RODMAN (DD-456)

Ship biography

The USS RODMAN is the first ship in the US Navy to be named in honor of Admiral Hugh Rodman.
The destroyer is the twenty-second ship in the GLEAVES class.
The keel of the ship was laid on December 16, 1940 at the Federal Shipbuilding and Dry Dock Company in Kearny, New Jersey. Mrs. Patricia R. Stebbins, wife of Albert Kellogg Stebbins, Jr. (December 27, 1899 - October 4, 1971 and great-niece of Admiral Hugh Rodman, christened the destroyer on September 26, 1941. Commander William Morgan Montgomery posed on January 27, 1942 the ship under his command entered service with the US Navy.