The battery voltage drops when turning

The charging voltage on the battery drops

Hello,

I have the Corsa petrol engine (built around 2003, with air conditioning) from my neighbor, whom I am supposed to help.

Its charged battery will hold power well, but it will run out after 2 to 3 days of driving. I suspect LiMa as a culprit, but I'm not sure.

Battery at standstill approx. 12.8 V.

After starting the motor, the voltage at the poles is briefly 14.4 V, but then drops continuously. After about 2 minutes it is only 13.1 V.

The LiMa does not make any noticeable running noises. According to the neighbor, the charging indicator does not light up while driving.

What do you suspect as the culprit?

greeting

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15 answers

Age of the battery?

How do you know that the battery "holds the power well" when it is empty again after 2 days?

Do you know if the battery was really full in between? Have you ever hung it on a reasonable charger for> 15h? Driving around the block for an hour does not fully charge an empty battery - not even remotely, and even less at this time of the year.

I can check the age of the battery tomorrow.

The statement "keeps the electricity good" is based on the neighbour's answers to my questions. The battery last weekend was easily> 24 hours on its charger, about the quality of which I cannot say anything. But in any case the car started again, and yesterday the battery (after driving 2-3x during the day) still had enough juice (see above).

You do not need to point out "take an hour around the block". He hadn't tried to charge the battery by driving. I am aware of the consequences of the season (lights, windshield wipers, blowers, heated rear window).

The neighbor was still on sick leave during the week and used the car very little. From next week he has to go back to work 25 km away, and to do this he has to go back to the charger every 3 days.

The values ​​of the Lima are okay, but if you accelerate at 13.1 volts, the voltage rises again?

As has already been written (age of the battery) possibly also test / measure on consumers.

You should also check the cables in the transition to the tailgate, because the D is already at the age where they like to break or are rubbed bare.

Quote:

@corsa 3 wrote on November 18, 2017 at 6:38:06 pm:

The values ​​of the Lima are okay, but if you accelerate at 13.1 volts, the voltage rises again?

Well ... slightly, maybe. 0.1 volts to 13.2 - 13.3, but no further.

Quote:

possibly also test / measure on consumers.

How do I test this? You mean consumers while driving, or at a standstill?

Quote:

You should also check the cables in the transition to the tailgate, because the D is already at the age where they like to break or are rubbed bare.

Aha - an inside tip. I didn't know there was a critical point. Very good. Do you have more of these in stock? I'll check it out tomorrow too.

By testing / measuring loads, I mean measuring the quiescent current, i.e. with the engine switched off.

At 13.3, that's not really a lot, but it can also be because the battery is full and the controller controls it that way. When you measure the charging voltage, everything connected to consumers (lights, rear window, blower, etc.) should then be higher. If it does not reach more than 14V, it is about to die, while measuring, use a jumper cable to connect the ground of the MINUS battery to the engine block. With this you can rule out a mass problem.

Quote:

@corsa 3 wrote on November 18, 2017 at 8:04:01 pm:

By testing / measuring loads, I mean measuring the quiescent current, i.e. with the engine switched off.

How do I do that?

And would an undiscovered consumer / short-circuit to ground be conceivable as a cause that only occurs during operation? According to the neighbors' statements, a picture emerges for me that the electricity only works when driving.

And fundamentally (the chafed tailgate cable in the back of your head): Shouldn't a cable burn with all these causes, or should a fuse be blown out beforehand?

Instructions for measuring quiescent current

https: //www.google.de/url? ...

Take a look at the picture, there was no fuse either.

If the voltage only collapses while driving, it may be due to a defective battery or a weakening alternator. But you should be able to check this by measuring with the consumers switched on.

Quote:

@corsa 3 wrote on November 18, 2017 at 8:04:01 pm:

At 13.3, that's not really a lot, but it can also be because the battery is full and the controller controls it that way. When you measure the charging voltage, everything connected to consumers (lights, rear window, fan, etc.) should then be higher. If it doesn’t get over 14V then it’s about to die,

Sure that the LiMa should ever regulate the charging voltage over 14V with a NON-AGM? Especially when you tear up all consumers? And without really increasing the speed?

Freudian mistake on my part: o

Of course I wanted to have written C-Forum. Otherwise I wouldn't have jumped on it.

And without clarification, postponing is also not the case.

First clarify the battery age and brand battery or not.

I had this "battery empty problem after approx. 3 days" in the Vectra B with an approx. 2 year old hardware store battery. After this scrap had given way to a new Varta, I was able to mothball my charger.

Unfortunately, it will only go towards next weekend until I can give answers.

Please be patient, thank you.

Battery?? Hm ... Doesn't make sense if you have 12.8 volts with normal measurements and 14.4 volts with the engine running.

The values ​​are ok so far!

The voltage must be kept at 14.4 volts when the engine is running and you are not switching on any additional consumers!

Even if the battery is broken and you measure the current at the battery terminals, there should still be 14, ... volts!

So I don't think the problem is with the battery!

Rather then the regulator of the alternator which could be defective or a cable tarnished or oxidized!

In order to exclude the battery very safely, it is best to briefly attach a second battery and see whether it works the same way! If so, then the battery is not there!