How to calculate the energy density for welding

Calories were yesterday - energy density is today

Today it is well known that diets do not work in the long run. The weight is usually back on faster than the pounds are down. If you want to escape this grueling yo-yo effect, only one thing will help: Eat your fill with the right foods. The calorie content is less important than the energy density. This means the number of calories per unit of weight.

Foods that are high in water and fiber are typically low in energy. In contrast, products that contain a lot of sugar, fat and starch have a high density of energy.

This is how the energy density is determined

Energy density is calculated by dividing the calorie content of a certain amount of a food by its weight.

Example: 100 grams of apple contain 50 kilocalories (kcal). Dividing 50 by 100 results in an energy density of 0.5

The energy density indicates how many kilocalories one gram of a food contains. (see tables below) One gram of apple contains 0.5 (kcal). One gram of croissant, on the other hand, has 5.1 kcal, which is ten times the energy density.

Trick recognized? You can eat more for the same "price" and become fuller if you pay attention to the energy density of your food choices.

Get full and save calories in the process

In fact, studies and laboratory experiments have shown that the driving force behind satiety is the total amount of food consumed - not the energy consumed. For example, a large plate of vegetable soup is better and more sustainable than a handful of potato chips, which contain far more calories.

The driving force behind satiety is the total amount of food consumed - not the energy consumed.

Since hunger is a bad companion, you should eat as many low-energy foods as possible. These primarily include vegetables, fruits and low-fat products. But you don't have to go without your favorite dishes. Because it depends on the mix. For example, if you like to eat pizza, cut the portion in half and have a large salad with it. Or spice up your morning muesli with fresh fruit.

Combine cleverly

By cleverly combining them, you can kill several birds with one stone: You cover the entire spectrum of vitamins and minerals you need and fill your stomach in the process. On top of that, you will lose weight.

This has now even been scientifically proven: In a meta-analysis of more than 2,000 studies, a scientific team from the German Institute for Nutrition Research (DIfE) found that there is a significant connection between the consumption of foods with a low energy density and a reduction in body weight in overweight subjects consists. That means in good German: The trick of the full plate with few calories really helps with weight loss.

The trick of the full plate low in calories really helps with weight loss.

Energy density of food

Low energy density (<1.5 kcal / g)

Fruit, vegetables, lettuce, potatoes, lean meat such as chicken breast or beef fillet, low-fat milk and dairy products such as yogurt, quark, or buttermilk. Caution: the higher the fat, the higher the higher the energy density. An avocado does not fall into this category any more than a camembert or cream yogurt.

Medium energy density (1.5 - 2.5 kcal / g)

Cereal products such as bread, rolls, muesli, pasta and rice, lentils, meat.

High energy density (> 2.5 kcal / g)

Sausage, cheese, butter, whipped cream, oil, nuts, cakes, croissants, cookies, chocolate and other sweets, snacks, chips, french fries. Generally, fast foods and highly processed foods fall into this category.

Special role drinks

Calorie-containing drinks play a special role. Due to their high water content, their energy density is usually not particularly high. But Cola & Co. don't fill you up; the sugary drinks are just empty calories. Alcohol has also been shown to stimulate appetite. So think twice about whether you would be better off without your glass of wine or beer if you want to lose weight.

The three energy suppliers

Calories or kilocalories (kcal.) Provide our body with energy. They are made up of the three building blocks carbohydrates, fat and protein.

  • With 910 kcal, fat has the highest calorific value per 100 grams
  • Protein and carbohydrates each have a calorific value of approx. 410 kcal.

Fat, protein and carbohydrates

The extent to which our diet should consist of these three main nutrients has been the subject of intense discussion for a long time.

The German Nutrition Society considers carbohydrates to be quantitatively the most important source of energy and recommends that healthy adults consume at least 50 percent of their daily energy intake in the form of carbohydrates. However, carbohydrates are not all carbohydrates: They do not mean sweets, for example, but rather fruit, vegetables, legumes, potatoes and as much whole grain as possible. The good thing about these energy suppliers is that they have a high level of satiety due to their large volume and contain numerous vitamins and minerals.

The remaining energy requirement - with a normal diet - should be covered to 30 percent with fat and 20 percent with protein.

A healthy adult who only moves moderately needs about 2,000 kcal a day. According to the current dietary recommendations, your diet should consist of around 250 g of carbohydrates, 65 g of fat and up to 75 g of protein.

carbohydrates are the most important sources of energy for humans next to fat. They consist of sugar molecules that occur in our food either in the form of grape sugar (glucose) and fruit sugar (fructose), or in complex form, for example as starch in bread, pasta, rice and potatoes. In particular, our brain and muscles are dependent on the supply of carbohydrates.

fat supplies - apart from energy - essential fatty acids that the body cannot produce itself. In addition, the body can only absorb the fat-soluble vitamins A, D, E and K with the help of fat. So fat is needed. Use mainly health-promoting fats that are high in polyunsaturated fatty acids.

protein is required for the development of the body's own proteins, and proteins are involved in the formation of muscles and bones. The basic elements of proteins are amino acids. Cells, tissues, organs and blood, enzymes, various hormones such as insulin are made up of amino acids. The body cannot produce some amino acids itself, so they have to be taken in with the diet in the form of protein.

If you want to lose weight ...

the calorie intake must of course be below your daily requirement Whether you prefer to save on carbohydrates, fat or protein is up to you. According to the principle of energy density, all energy suppliers are allowed. The main thing is that the relationship between calories and food volume is correct.

Tip: With our calorie requirement calculator you can easily determine how many calories you consume per day.

Energy density of selected foods

Food

Energy density (kcal / g)

Fresh grain porridge with yogurt and fruit

0,7

Muesli with milk, honey and fruit

1,1

Apple pie, yeast dough

1,3

Pasta, without egg, cooked

1,4

pumpernickel

1,8

Whole grain bread with sunflower seeds

2,2

Toast, wheat flour

2,4

Wheat bread (white bread)

2,4

Pretzel

3

cornflakes

3,5

lemon cake

3,8

Linzertorte

4,2

croissant

5,1

Food

Energy density (kcal / g)

cucumber

0,1

Chicory

0,2

Beans, green

0,3

parsnip

0,6

Potatoes

0,7

Peas

0,8

French fries, oven

2,5

lenses

2,8

Soybeans

3,3

French fries, deep-fried

3,3

Potato Chips

5,5

Food

Energy density (kcal / g)

strawberry

0,3

cherry

0,5

Apple

0,5

Pineapple, raw

0,6

grapes

0,7

Pineapple, canned

0,8

Olives, black, marinated

1,9

avocado

2,2

Mango, dried

2,9

Food

Energy density (kcal / g)

Whey, sweet

0,3

Buttermilk

0,4

Yogurt, 1.5% fat

0,5

Cow's milk, 1.5% fat

0,5

Cow's milk, 3.5% fat

0,6

Yogurt, 3.5% fat

0,7

Cream cheese, at least 10% F.i.Tr.

0,9

Mozzarella, 20% F.i.Tr.

1

Camembert, 30% F.i.Tr.

2,2

Cream cheese, 60% F.i.Tr.

2,5

Sour cream, 30% fat

2,9

Whipped cream, 30% fat

3

Parmesan, 45% F.i.Tr.

3,9

Camembert, 70% F.i.Tr.

4,1

Blue cheese, 60% F.i.Tr.

4,3

Food

Energy density (kcal / g)

Beef, fillet

1,2

Chicken, breast with skin

1,5

Minced meat, mixed (beef / pork)

1,7

Rump steak, fried

2,1

Lamb shank

2,3

Wiener sausages

2,6

Liver sausage, fine

3,3

Goose, meat with skin

3,4

Salami, German

4

Landjäger

4,7

Smoked pork bacon

6,2

Food

Energy density (kcal / g)

Semi-fat margarine

3,7

Butter, semi-fat

3,9

Salad mayonnaise, 50% fat

4,8

Vegetable margarine

7,2

butter

7,5

olive oil

9

Rapeseed oil

9

Food

Energy density (kcal / g)

Red fruit jelly with vanilla sauce

0,8

Rice pudding with cinnamon and sugar

1

Creme brulee

3,2

marzipan

4,9

White chocolate

5,4

Children's chocolate

5,6

Dark chocolate, 70% cocoa

6

peanut butter

6,2