What is the final draft of the form

Introduction to forms

A form in Access is a database object that you can use to create a user interface for a database application. A "bound" form is a form that is directly linked to a data source, e.g. With a table or query, and can be used to enter, edit, or view data from a data source. Alternatively, you can create an "unbound" form that is not directly linked to a data source, but still contains command buttons, labels, or other controls that you need to operate the application.

This article mainly focuses on bound forms. You can use bound forms to control access to data, such as which data fields or rows are displayed. For example, some users need only be able to view a few fields from a table with many fields. If you provide these users with a form that contains only these fields, you make it easier for them to use the database. You can also add command buttons and other features to forms to automate common actions.

Think of bound forms as windows through which users can see and access your database. An efficient form speeds up the use of your database because users don't have to search for what they need. A visually appealing form also makes working with the database more pleasant and efficient and can also prevent incorrect data from being entered.

Note: This article assumes that you have already created a table (or a query based on multiple tables) and that you want to create a form to view or edit the data.

Content of this article

Create a form using the forms tool

With the form tool, you can create a form with a click of the mouse. When you use this tool, all fields from the underlying data source are placed on the form. You can start using the new form right away, or you can change it in Layout view or Design view to better suit your needs.

Use the form tool to create a new form

  1. In the navigation pane, click the table or query that you want to appear on the form.

  2. Click the tab Create in the group Forms on form.

Access creates the form and displays it in layout view. In Layout view, you can make design changes to the form while data is displayed. For example, you can adjust the size of the text fields to the data if necessary.

When Access finds a single table with a one-to-many relationship to the table or query that you used to create the form, Access adds a data sheet to the form based on the associated table or query. For example, if you create a simple form based on the Employees table and a one-to-many relationship has been defined between the Employees table and the Orders table, the datasheet will contain all of the records in the Orders table that belong to the current data record "Employees". You can delete the data sheet from the form if you don't need it. If there are multiple tables with a one-to-many relationship with the table that you used to create the form, Access will not add any datasheets to the form.

Creating a Split Form Using the Split Form Tool

With a split form, you get two views of the data at the same time - a form view and a datasheet view.

A split form differs from a form / subform combination in that both views are connected to the same data source and are constantly synchronized with each other. If you select a field in one part of the form, the same field is also selected in the other part of the form. You can add, edit, or delete data in either part (provided the record source is updatable and you have not configured the form to prevent these actions).

When working with split forms, you can take advantage of both types of forms in a single form. For example, you can quickly search for a record in the data sheet part of the form and then view or edit it in the form part.

Use the Split Form tool to create a split form:

  1. In the navigation pane, click the table or query that you want to appear on the form. Or open the table or query in Datasheet view.

  2. Click the tab Create in the group Forms on More forms, and then click Split form.

Access creates the form and displays it in Layout view. In Layout view, you can make design changes to the form while data is displayed. For example, you can adjust the size of the text fields to the data if necessary. For more information about form views, see the Understanding Layout View and Design View section.

Using the Multiple Items Tool to Create a Form That Displays Multiple Records

When you create a form using the Forms Tool, only one record at a time appears in the form that Access creates. If you need a form that shows multiple records but is more customizable than a datasheet, use the Multiple Items tool.

  1. In the navigation pane, click the table or query that you want to appear on the form.

  2. Click the tab Create in the group Forms on More forms, and then click Multiple elements.

Access creates the form and displays it in layout view. In Layout view, you can make design changes to the form while data is displayed.

When you use the Multiple Items tool, the form that Access creates is similar to a data sheet. The data is arranged in rows and columns, and more than one record is displayed at a time. However, a Multiple Items form offers more customization options than a datasheet, such as the ability to add graphical elements, buttons, and other controls. For more information about customizing the form, see Optimizing Your Form in Layout View and Optimizing Your Form in Design View.

Create a form using the Form Wizard

If you want to be more specific about which fields are displayed on the form, you can use the Form Wizard instead of the various form-building tools mentioned earlier. You can also define how the data should be grouped and sorted, and you can use fields from more than one table or query, provided you have established the relationships between the tables and queries in advance.

  1. Click the tab Create in the group Forms on Form wizard.

  2. Follow the instructions on the form wizard pages.

    Note: If you want your form to contain fields from multiple tables and queries, do not click Further still on Completeafter selecting the fields from the first table or query on the first page of the Form Wizard. Instead, repeat the steps to select a table or query and click additional fields that you want to add to the form. Then click on Further or Completeto continue the process.

  3. On the last page of the wizard, click Complete.

Create a form using the Blank Forms Creator

If the Form Wizard or the form creation tools don't meet your needs, you can use the Blank Form tool to create a form. This can be a quick way to create a form, especially if you only want to display a few fields on the form.

  1. Click the tab Create in the group Forms on Empty form.

    Access opens an empty form in the layout view and shows the area Field list at.

  2. Click in the area Field list on the plus sign (+) next to the table or tables that contain the fields you want to appear on the form.

  3. To add a field to the form, double-click the field or drag it onto the form.

    • After the first field is added, you can add multiple fields at once by holding down the CTRL key, clicking multiple fields, and then dragging them onto the form at the same time.

    • The order of the tables in the area Field list depends on which part of the form is currently selected. If you don't see the field you want to add, select a different part of the form, and then try adding the field again.

  4. Use the tools in the group Header / Footer on the tab designto add a logo, title, or date and time to the form.

  5. Use the tools in the group Controls the tab designto add more controls to the form.

    For a slightly wider selection of controls, switch to Design view by right-clicking the form, then clicking Draft view click.

Understanding Layout View and Design View

Layout view Layout view is the most intuitive way to make changes to the form and can be used for almost any change you might want to make to a form in Access.

In the layout view, the form is actually executed. You can therefore see your data as it appears when you use the form. You can also make changes to the form design in this view. Since you can see your data as you modify the form, this is a very useful view for resizing controls or for almost any other task involving the look and usability of the form.

If a task occurs that cannot be done in Layout view, you can switch to Design view. In certain situations, Access displays a message asking you to switch to Design view before you can make a specific change.

Draft view The design view provides a more detailed look at the structure of the form. You will see the "Header", "Footer", and "Details" sections of the form. The form does not run when viewed in Design view. Therefore, you cannot see the underlying data while you are making design changes. However, there are some tasks that you can do more easily in Design view than in Layout view. You can do the following:

  • Add a wider variety of controls to your form, such as: B. bound object fields, page breaks and diagrams.

  • Edit the control contents of text boxes in the text boxes themselves without using the property sheet

  • Change the size of form sections such as the Header and Details sections

  • Changing certain form properties that cannot be changed in Layout view

Optimizing your form in layout view

After you've created a form, you can easily optimize it in Layout view. Using the actual form data as a guide, you can rearrange and resize the controls. You can also place new controls on the form and set the properties for the form and its controls.

To switch to layout view, right-click the form name in the navigation area and then click Layout view.

Access displays the form in layout view.

Use the property sheet to change the properties of the form and its controls and sections. To display the property sheet, press F4.

You can use the area Field list to add fields from the underlying table or query to the form design. How to show the area Field list at:

  • Click the tab design in the group Tools on Add existing fields, or use the keyboard shortcut ALT + F8.

You can then add fields directly from the area Field list Drag onto the form.

  • To add a single field, double-click it or drag the field out of the area Field list to the section of the form where you want the field to appear.

  • To add multiple fields at once, hold down Ctrl and click the fields you want to add. Then drag the selected fields onto the form.

Optimize your form in Design view

You can also optimize the design of the form in Design view. You can add new controls and fields to the form by adding them to the design grid. The property sheet gives you access to many properties that you can set to customize your form.

To switch to Design view, right-click the form in the Navigation Pane, then click Draft view.

Access displays the form in Design view.

Use the property sheet to change the properties of the form and its controls and sections. To display the property sheet, press F4.

You can use the area Field list to add fields from the underlying table or query to the form design. How to show the area Field list at:

  • Click the tab design in the group Tools on Add existing fields, or use the keyboard shortcut ALT + F8.

You can then add fields directly from the area Field list Drag onto the form.

  • To add a single field, double-click it or drag the field out of the area Field list to the section of the form where you want the field to appear.

  • To add multiple fields at once, hold down Ctrl and click the fields you want to add. Then drag the selected fields onto the form.