Kino What does CC

Creative Commons licenses

What is Creative Commons - and what do the abbreviations and icons mean?

[german version] For years many have known that you can use Creative Commons licenses in connection with works protected by copyright. But what exactly is Creative Commons? A license? No, an organization. And what do the abbreviations and icons mean. The basic idea behind the CreativeCommons licenses is very good and very helpful for everyone involved - but only if everyone understands what it is about.

The following infographic is intended to help make the concept understandable. Artists and creatives can then think about whether it would make sense to place their works under a CC license. Hopefully, users will understand better what they have to consider when using or sharing CC-licensed images.

This infographic is welcome to share / present (CC-BY-SA). I would be happy to have a link on this page.

See also: de.creativecommons.org/was-ist-cc

Notes on the CC infographic

The infographic can be read like a comic (line by line from top left to bottom right). Here is a brief description of what is depicted: The Internet is increasingly becoming a The core of our culture. The possibility of further dissemination with a simple mouse click plays a significant role. Creative all branches and genres (Fine arts, music, literature, poetry, photography etc) post their works on websites and enrich the web. Of course, all of these works are protected by copyright. The use or distribution is therefore prohibited in principle. But: many artists would like to share their work - even if only under certain conditions.

The problem: License terms and agreements are a complicated thing. Lots Creatives don't know exactly how you have to correctly formulate these conditions so that they are legally stable. And when it comes to provisions (formulated by artists), users often do not really know what exactly is meant by them. Unspeakable waves of warnings contribute to general uncertainty. What can you use when, where and how?

The solution: This is exactly where the non-profit organization Creative Commons ("CC") comes in: it offers six license models. The current version is CC-3.0. There are four possible conditions:

  • Attribution (Abbreviation "BY", Icon: human figure)
  • No editing (Abbreviation "ND"from" no derivatives ", Icon: equals sign)
  • Noncommercial (Abbreviation "NC"from" non commercial ", Icon: crossed dollar or euro symbol)
  • Transfer under the same conditions (Abbreviation: "SA"from" Share alike ", Icon: circular arrow)

The combination of these four conditions results in six different license agreements (currently version 3.0). They are available as a short form as well as in a detailed version on the homepage of de.creativecommons.org.

Table with the icons and text abbreviations. If necessary, please download the icons and store them on your own web space (e.g. Wordpress media library)

Important: none of the six licenses are unconditional. At least the author / creator must always be specified under or next to CC licensed works.

License yourself? Here you can have a corresponding icon including the correct CC license and link created for individual works: creativecommons.org/choose/?lang=de

In my opinion, the CreativeCommons initiative is one very good thing. It helps regulate the license conditions for the free flow and distribution of creative works on the Internet.

Continue reading

  • In the tagSeoBlog I wrote an article in which one would like to Comments or additions can comment (unfortunately this page does not have a comment function). In the article I also initiate a discussion as to whether there should be another condition: the obligation to backlink to the author's homepage or one of his social media profiles (Google+, Twitter, Facebook, Flickr, etc). I'm looking forward to an exciting discussion. See: Creative Commons (Infographic) - What About Backlink Requirement?
  • On this site there are another infographic, see: Royalty-free images - what to watch out for? on the connection between copyright, right of use and image licenses (often mediated through stock photo portals).
  • Here I have compiled 23 sources where you can find many royalty-free images and photos for free use on the Internet.

PS: you can Infographic happy Download, print, use in the blog or share on the social web. Only commercial use (sale) is excluded. Here you can download the graphic in three image sizes:

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